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What you need to know to navigate the New York probate process

When someone dies in New York, their estate must go through a legal process known as probate in order to be distributed to their heirs. This process can be confusing and complicated, especially if you are not familiar with the law. Here’s a look at everything you need to know about probate so that you can navigate the process smoothly and efficiently.

What is probate?

Probate is the legal process of distributing a person’s estate after they die. This process includes gathering the deceased person’s assets, paying their debts and taxes, and dividing the remaining assets among their heirs. If the deceased person had a will, it must be filed with the court and followed in order to distribute the assets according to the wishes of the deceased. If there was no will, then state law will dictate how the assets are distributed.

Navigating the probate process

There are several things you can do to make the probate process go more smoothly. First, be sure to gather all of the deceased person’s important documents, such as their will, death certificate, bank statements and credit card bills. You will also need to appoint a legal representative for the estate who will handle all of the legal proceedings. According to state law, if there is no will, you will need to nominate an executor.

You should also start notifying creditors of the death as soon as possible so that they do not try to come for the estate’s assets after the executor distributes them. Finally, keep a detailed account of all expenses and income related to the estate during the probate process. This will help you keep track of how much money is being spent and who is receiving payments from the estate.

Probate can be a complicated process, but you can make it go as smoothly as possible by following these tips. Keep in mind that the time you may need to complete the probate process varies depending on the complexity of the estate and whether disputes arise among heirs.

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