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Preventing premises liability can start with the architect

The aim of each New York architect should be to design and plan safe buildings. While premises liability might be the last thing on an architect's mind, he or she, along with any other parties associated with the construction project, could face claims for monetary damages by anyone who suffers serious injuries in a building. Any architect who wants to maintain a good reputation and integrity while also protecting everybody who will enter the building will consider all the known potential hazards in the design of the structure.

Being financially responsible for broken bones, neck injuries, paralysis, internal bleeding, head and brain injuries can largely be prevented by consideration of matters like non-slip flooring to prevent slip-and-fall injuries. To prevent falls on stairways, the railings must be tested to ensure they would withstand the force of someone grabbing them or falling against them. If escalators and elevators are to be installed in the building, design flaws and faulty installations can have severe consequences.

Security is often addressed as an afterthought, while the placement of lighting and security cameras is best planned by the architect to reduce the risk of assault and other crimes. Other matters to consider include fire safety and the building materials used to reduce fire risks. Weather-related hazards can also be mitigated if they are addressed in the design stage.

When someone suffers serious injuries in a building through no fault of their own, they might have questions about their legal rights to pursue claims for damage recovery. Determining the appropriate defendants to include in a premises liability lawsuit could be challenging. However, the support and guidance of an experienced New York personal injury attorney can simplify the process.

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