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Medical malpractice: The financial impact of cerebral palsy

The birth of a child should be a highlight in the lives of parents, but when things go wrong during the birthing process, the consequences could be devastating. Negligence of the medical team could result in cerebral palsy or other neurological disorders that might be irreversible. Such errors lead to many medical malpractice lawsuits in New York.

Although cerebral palsy could be a congenital disease, injuries or infection during birth or in the aftermath could cause this disorder to develop. As a result, the child will experience pain and suffering along with physical and mental anguish -- and the parents will likely share the latter. There will be immediate medical expenses along with future care, which might involve in-home care, treatments and equipment, and the home of the parents might require structural changes.

If a parent needs to give up an occupation to care for the child, that income will be lost. Furthermore, special education-related services such as speech therapists and tutors to assist with the child's learning disabilities may be required. The brain damage that causes cerebral palsy is permanent, and although it is not degenerative, life-long care costs must be considered, including therapy and mobility devices such as walkers, crutches, scooters and wheelchairs.

No typical family can anticipate the financial impact of such a tragedy, and although the primary concern for parents would be obtaining the necessary medical care, steps can be taken to pursue financial relief. An experienced New York medical malpractice attorney can determine the viability of such a claim. If grounds exist, the lawyer can provide the necessary guidance and support throughout ensuing legal proceedings.

Source: consumersafety.org, "Cerebral Palsy Lawsuit", Curtis Weyant, Accessed on March 9, 2018

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