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Dissolvable implant may be used to monitor brain injury

Brain injuries in New York can affect a person long term, both cognitively and emotionally. Unfortunately, there is currently no cure for this medical problem. Researchers, however, have come up with a potential way to monitor brain injury, involving the use of an implant that actually melts away when it is no longer needed.

The implant so far has been used in the early stages of animal studies. Scientists essentially have placed meltable chips in the brains of rats, with these chips holding small electronic wires and sensors. They hope that one day, the dissolving sensors may help to eradicate the need for large systems that are externally hard wired and leave patients at risk of infections, allergic reactions and bleeding.

The dissolvable implant is about the size of a rice gain. It is placed beneath the skin and atop the skull of a rat. The implants are designed to monitor intracranial temperature and pressure following brain surgery or traumatic brain injury; this is essential since skulls keep brains from expanding, so a rise in pressure or temperature may result in permanent spinal or brain damage.

Sometimes a brain injury results from a vehicle accident or a slip-and-fall accident on another person's property. If these or other types of accidents occur because of the negligence of another party in New York, the injured victim has the right to file a personal injury claim, seeking damages, which -- if achieved -- may help to cover the cost of medical care required due to the injury. Monetary compensation cannot reverse the injury-causing events that took place, but it may help the victim to more easily move forward from the incident.

Source: CNN, "Tiny implant monitors brain injury, then melts away", Sandee LaMotte, Jan. 18, 2016

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